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Equal pay

Editorials

7/12/2019, 6 a.m.
We congratulate 15-year-old tennis phenom Coco Gauff for her terrific performance at Wimbledon and the members of the U.S. Women’s ...

We congratulate 15-year-old tennis phenom Coco Gauff for her terrific performance at Wimbledon and the members of the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team who brought home the FIFA World Cup this week.

Their skill, training and dedication to their respective sports have given people worldwide something to cheer about. They are a joy to watch, and we wish them continued success.

We also must remember that while we are enjoying their stellar performances, this is a profession for these athletes. They should be paid in sums equal to that of their male counterparts.

Wimbledon went through this some time ago when women competitors were denied equal pay with male players. But because of the advocacy of players and pressure from supporters and the public, winners of the men’s and women’s singles tournaments will each walk away with the same amount this year — a cool $2.9 million.

Unfortunately, members of the U.S. women’s soccer team had to file a lawsuit earlier this year to get the U.S. Soccer Federation to understand they are serious about equal pay. The suit, now in mediation, has garnered global attention and support for the women. Fans gathered in the World Cup stadium in Lyon, France, erupted into a chant of “Equal pay!” after the Americans’ victory last Sunday. 

The women’s games garnered major TV audiences worldwide and brought in ads and sponsorships for the games. It is the second consecutive world championship for the American women and the fourth overall for the team. The U.S. men’s team can’t boast the same.

The solution is simple and global: Equal pay for women in sports and all professions. 

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